Dive in, splash around, skim and dip and spout about the latest quotations, metaphors, words and, of course, triologisms. You’ll feel better for it!

A quote to note

Drawing on thousands of sparkling, moving and inspiring quotations amassed during decades of attentive reading. To delight your mind and spirit and improve your presentations beyond belief.

Ancient travellers

Ancient travellers

Perhaps this is obvious, but it had never occurred to me in any conscious way, and I wonder how far it is true, as I have a romantic image of people...

read more
Quail not

Quail not

In the 1950s Louis Golding loosely followed the footsteps of Odysseus in a quest to reach Ithaca after three decades of detours.  He occasionally...

read more
Meat or fish?

Meat or fish?

On a delightful 20th century Odyssey to Ithaca, Golding is offered the choice of fish or meat.  He explains what prompted him to opt for the...

read more
The poet as compass

The poet as compass

An enigmatic statement, perhaps born of the difficulty of pinning down Odysseus' journey on a real map, although there is no shortage of claims that...

read more

Metaphorically speaking

More marvelous metaphors on Mondays … Monday, metaphor day.

A circular accent

A circular accent

Seamus Heaney describes a circle to convey the sounds of the Ulster accent, drawing an image of tangential consonants and rolling vowels. ...

read more
The honey of knowledge

The honey of knowledge

This is from the first of a trilogy of memoirs by Maxim Gorky (1868-1936), whose life began in Tsarist Russia and ended in the Soviet Union.  His...

read more
As healthy as …

As healthy as …

A bracing, surprising simile for presenting something as a picture of health and wholesomeness.  Here it is about reading material, but it could...

read more
Successful avoidance

Successful avoidance

George Eliot captures a moment in which two people deeply attracted to one another manage to feign indifference, each deriving satisfaction from...

read more

Triologisms

Bringing you pithy, evocative imagery in the form of three-legged microcosms of meaning. Updated on Tuesdays … Tuesday, triologism day!  You’ll never see this day of the week in the same way again.

Frost-wrapped fields

Frost-wrapped fields

Norfolk is a small Netherlands of flat land and soaring firmament, cloud-churned.  My grandmother lived there for about a decade and I spent happy...

read more
Gum-burning brandy

Gum-burning brandy

A toothache-anaesthetizing solution gives a jaunty air to this fun concept of the Dullest Exhibition-case Award.  But lest you think Winder is...

read more
Long-somnolent border

Long-somnolent border

In the absence of functioning treaties or other guarantees of peace, let us pray for long-somnolent borders that they may remain in blissful...

read more
Lacquer-black Vltava

Lacquer-black Vltava

Lovely vowel harmony in that 'lacquer-black', it deserves to entirely supplant the boringly bog standard 'pitch black'.  Do me a favour and use it...

read more
Brocade-trimmed orrery

Brocade-trimmed orrery

The stereotype of the anally retentive chamberlain mechanically following a ritual timetable reminds me of Sourdust in Mervyn Peake's Titus Groan,...

read more
Headache-inducing explosions

Headache-inducing explosions

Now you know why the Jesuits' stupendously lavish baroque churches needed all those gilded churrigueresque curlicues, to better serve a didactic...

read more

Words

Sharing words that sparkle, appeal, intrigue or otherwise grab me, including in other languages. And adoring alliteration, words are added on Wednesdays… Wednesday, word day. See you back here then.

Lauzengier

Lauzengier

Lauzengier (also 'lauzenger') appears in the songs of French troubadours.  An old Occitan word but surely one which it may be timely to pluck from...

Gulch it down

Gulch it down

Mervyn Peake uses Rabelaisian vocabulary to describe the gargantuan appetites and appearance of Swelter, the castle cook in his Gormenghast trilogy....

Mummarella

Mummarella

You would know the 'true' octopus if you saw it, wouldn't you? Reading a book about Mediterranean seafood, Luiz learned that according to an...

Ullage of sunflower

Ullage of sunflower

Something about this word that you can roll around the mouth like a good swig of wine or cognac, the removal of which would result in its ullage in...

Cragfast

Cragfast

Stuck?  In a tight corner?  No going forward ... or back?  Call yourself Cragfast. A sheep cornered on a crag, to starve in the absence of rescue....

Gummocks

Gummocks

This glorious word being no longer current, I invite you to revive it the next time someone does something daft or useless. Perhaps combine it...

I find it moving that no literary text is utterly original, no literary text is completely unique, that it stems from previous texts, built on quotations and misquotations, on the vocabularies fashioned by others and transformed through imagination and use.  Writers must find consolation in the fact that there is no very first story and no last one.  Our literature reaches further back than the beginnings of our memory permits us, and further into the future than our imagination allows us to conceive, but that must be the only barrier.  

Source: Alberto Manguel, The City of Words, CBC Massey Lecture Series (Toronto: Anansi Press, 2007), p. 139

Love writingredux.com?  Enjoy our sister sites:

www.foolsareeverywhere.com    I    www.nuannaarpoq.com

 

© Beatrice Otto 2020 - design & content unless otherwise stated - all rights reserved

 

Pin It on Pinterest