As healthy as …

As healthy as …

A bracing, surprising simile for presenting something as a picture of health and wholesomeness.  Here it is about reading material, but it could apply to anything else. Our Boys appeared regularly, a cultural antidote with official home backing, healthy as a Christian...

Successful avoidance

Successful avoidance

George Eliot captures a moment in which two people deeply attracted to one another manage to feign indifference, each deriving satisfaction from their stand off, like a drug addict who has held back. 'They had begun the morning with an indifferent salutation, and both...

The mind’s cheap tunes

The mind’s cheap tunes

A sharp way to capture the Groundhog Day repetition of pointlessly churning regrets and anxieties: like a jingle you can't get out of your mind even though it brings no pleasure or insight. 'Almost every morning, regrets and anxieties had run through my mind like a...

Cables like mating adders

Cables like mating adders

Serpents coiling around each other is Seethaler's way of describing inch-thick twining cables stretched across swathes of sky.'Cables twenty-five millimetres thick and interwined like pairs of mating adders would slice through the sky across a distance of almost two...

Landscape like lace

Landscape like lace

A surprising description of the Mediterranean and its surrounding landscapes, resembling a collage of lace and sackcloth. 'For the Mediterranean is a sea surrounded by mountain ranges: its fertile plains and river-valleys are like pieces of lace sewn on to...

Open to the climbing sun

Open to the climbing sun

A lovely image conveying the age-old human yearning to be closer to God or heaven or some other source: a flower opening to the sun as it climbs the sky.  This is from a beautifully written history of a period we commonly skim over and yet which has a much richer...

The thinker, with his metaphors, will illuminate the external world through intangible ideas that for him are intimate and immediate.   

Source: Jorge Luis Borges, On Writing, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 2010, p. 6

More metaphors for those who missed these earlier posts.   Enjoy!

 

Petrified sea

Petrified sea

A fine image of mountains appearing like rearing waves petrified in mid air. ... the mountains that rear above the Valley of the Kings like startled waves.  Source: Justin Marozzi, The Man Who Invented History: Travels with Herodotus (London: John Murray, 2009), p....

The Nile as sapphire

The Nile as sapphire

A fortuitous phrase to describe the Nile's blue tracery through a dry landscape, like a life-giving vein.... the sapphire cleft of the Nile. Source: Justin Marozzi, The Man Who Invented History: Travels with Herodotus (London: John Murray, 2009), p. 26Photo credit:...

Bright as …

Bright as …

This simile brought to mind an image of a magnesium flare, and reminded me of others I've shared here on brightness and related qualities, such as George Eliot's description of a sizzlingly active mind; Virginia Woolf on a pair of bright eyes; Patrick Leigh Fermor on...

The quick forge of thought

The quick forge of thought

Marvelous metaphor by Shakespeare, suggesting (to me) that the foment and energy of a city like London forges thought among its people. Something taut and elemental here, with the din and heat of a blacksmiths workshop echoing the noise and bustle of a great...

History as burp

History as burp

Possibly the best metaphor I have found for the tendency of history to resurface in surprising ways.  I see this as all the more reason to study it, to give us some time-deep context with which to better navigate the uncertain waters called 'life'. And not be...

Sea the colour

Sea the colour

I love different ways of describing eyes, and colours, and this one allows some range in its definition.  Blue or grey or green, or somewhere on that spectrum? 'Eyes the colour of the North Sea in February...'For further eye colour quotes, meet other sea-related eyes,...

Emotions surfacing

Emotions surfacing

A delicate description of unexpressed feelings becoming strong enough to be palpable, like a scent in the room. 'Hurt and affection were so close to the surface that morning, they were like a scent hanging in the rooms.' Source: Adam Nicolson, Sissinghurst: An...

Cryptic afterlife

Cryptic afterlife

Baron Franz von der Trenck (1711-49), despite dying young and in disgrace, somehow contrived to be preserved in long life unguents. I like the understated description of the vaults he shares with endless Capucin monk-mummies, though I have no desire to visit.Trenck...

Of besieged landscapes

Of besieged landscapes

An unusual simile to describe a highly fortified landscape with a troubled history.  For some wondrous word-paintings of beautiful landscapes in this region, read Miklos Banffy's Transylvanian Trilogy.One of the world's most introvert, besieged landscapes, south-east...

As easy as …

As easy as …

A fun simile to sum up wiping out your enemies with ease and efficiency.For a while he was able to dispose of them with the ease of a marksman shooting plastic ducks at a fairground.For other examples of Winder wit, see our celebration of his earlier book,...

Alert to danger

Alert to danger

This made me laugh out loud when reading Simon Winder's Danubia late one night. Parents ever-so-delicately trying to inveigle their children into the joys of Culture, and getting a visceral reaction.  I love the 'threatened cats' simile. We would light-heartedly bring...

Breathing on a crystal

Breathing on a crystal

A limpid simile to describe a lovely human being. Maggie is simple and direct, but her innate charm and beauty cause considerable complexity of feeling among others. And let's not breathe on the crystal that lets the light through, we need it. 'To ask her to be less...

Looking good

Looking good

The poor old boy, pallid and wan, in stark and merciless juxtaposition to the ruddy picture of health and well-being, Sir James.  'Skinned over for the occasion', beat that. 'Really, by the side of Sir James, he looks like a death's head skinned over for the...

Mental shallows

Mental shallows

A splendid simile for a shallow-minded person, and I loved the 'nethermost sediment', in which murk turbid calculations are taking place as to whether her dying brother could possibly leave his wealth to any but his blood relations. He keeps the whole lot of them...

Great grassy hills

Great grassy hills

A beautiful description of a large-hearted calming character, who has a benign influence on those around him. We need more Cadwalladers around, quieting 'irritated egoism' and making it even a little ashamed of itself. 'Mr Cadwallader was a large man, with full lips...

As active as…

As active as…

What a great simile to describe a fast-darting, quick-acting mind!  Sadly, this vivid image also reminds me of a certain virus now prevalent, being similarly active and biting everything that comes near. 'With such a mind, active as phosphorus, biting everything that...

The timbre of a voice

The timbre of a voice

Voices are evanescent and yet they can stay with us all our lives; I can still 'hear' the voices of my mother and grandmother.  Some voices are striking for their timbre and I liked this description of Dorothea's voice in Middlemarch. 'But what a voice! It was like...

As fit as …

As fit as …

I learned of this fitting simile for fitness in a phone call this morning. A friend was telling me about a life-threatening accident he had had, which put him in hospital for weeks. As they were trying to weigh up his survival chances, they asked his GP how healthy...

On being learned

On being learned

Dorothea is the more studious of two sisters and marries an older bookish chap, to the consternation of her relatives. Here her sister Celia expresses their concern and her author uses a charming simile to describe erudition as some kind of insidious invasion of...

As relaxing as …

As relaxing as …

Casaubon is a serious-minded studious individual pursuing research so recondite that only he really understands why he's doing it. When his doctor tells him he needs to let up and take it easy for the sake of his health, he takes it like a convict's sentence of hard...

Of rising darkness

Of rising darkness

This simile struck me months before we had heard of COVID-19, and it worked its way to the front of the pipeline quietly and unobstrusively. Only now does it look ominous as we mask up and distance ourselves from other people's exhalations. 'Like an exhalation', a...

As agreeable as …

As agreeable as …

What a satisfying simile for something being agreeable, like the ease and relief of a successful sneeze. How odd that this simile has come to the fore just as we are at home isolating ourselves from pandemic, and sneezes are not to be sniffed at. Be sneeze-free and...

As naturally as …

As naturally as …

Following the death of her husband, Dorothea dutifully tries to repress a deep wish to meet Will Ladislaw. George Eliot conveys beautifully the moment that her longing bursts the dam of her reasoning and restraint, using the simile of a suppressed sob. '... perhaps...

The spread of news

The spread of news

It's some time since I noted this simile for the effective spread of news.  Now, re-reading it as we watch the advance of the Covid-19, I realize it could stand as a metaphor for the effective spread of a virus. Enjoy the simile and bee well, wherever you are. 'News...

Eyes meeting eyes

Eyes meeting eyes

Dorothea stuns a silly, wilful and selfish young woman with her powerful, radiant kindness and, having meant to disdain her, the girl is undone by this unexpected sympathy. I liked the simile of blue flowers conveying the helplessness of her gaze. '... her eyes met...

A sack of scrap iron

A sack of scrap iron

A description of a huge, lumbering imperial frame, this referring to Tsar Nicholas I who succeeded his brother Alexander.'Though his heavy bones resembled scrap iron in a potato sack, he was handsome.'From the first and best volume of a trilogy of novels by the...

A falcon and a dove

A falcon and a dove

Dali is the younger of Hungarian aristocratic twins, and here is an early encounter with the beautiful, elusive Russian who would become his wife. He pursues her, falcon-like to her fleeing dove. A glorious Hungarian historical novel - first of a trilogy - spanning...

Of striking light

Of striking light

A vivid image, of light striking mountains like a hatchet splitting the darkness. From the first volume of an excellent Hungarian trilogy covering most of the 19th century events affecting an aristocratic family in the Austro-Hungarian empire.'Bluish light struck the...

Like a bone in the throat

Like a bone in the throat

A vivid simile to describe the bother that mighty Austria was for Prussia. This is from a trilogy of novels by the Hungarian writer Lajos Zilahy (1891-1974), tracing the decline of a Hungarian aristocratic family in the 19th century Austro-Hungarian empire and into...

Going on a date

Going on a date

The photographer Robert Capa, known for some of the most iconic war photos of the 20th century, explains how unmissable a date with an invasion is for a war correspondent. I liked the analogy. Capa was killed in action when he stepped on a mine at the age of 40. 'For...

As neat and fierce as …

As neat and fierce as …

Something refreshing about this simile, beginning with the surprising combination of 'neat' and 'fierce' and then the even more surprising 'fairy castle'.  But indeed, they are neat with their expected enchantments and imagined lineaments and they are fierce with...

Collective noun for epithets

Collective noun for epithets

I like this collective noun for epithets, 'artillery' suggesting a quickfire delivery of pithy comments, with the additional charm of a military echo in the resemblance between 'epithet' and 'epaulet'. '... an artillery of epithets.'   Source: George Eliot, The...

The feeling of a cur

The feeling of a cur

Mrs Glegg, as you can see from this simile, is not the most empathic or kind of characters. Here she seeks an easy target for her general frustration by turning on her younger sister who has suffered the consequences of her husband's obstinacy.'"Bessy, I'm sorry for...

Swimming in circles

Swimming in circles

A fine simile for a wife who after a good stretch of marriage, still presses all the wrong buttons with regards her husband; here she is likened to a gold-fish who continues to believe they are swimming in a straight line despite a life time of circling the fish bowl....

The chill of indifference

The chill of indifference

Philip is a sensitive and admirable character in George Eliot's classic novel, who devotedly loves Maggie Tulliver.  He is hampered by disability and feels indifference acutely, here likened to a chill wind. '... and Philip felt indifference as a child of the south...

As irrelevant as…

As irrelevant as…

Poor Mr. Dickson, but what a strong simile for irrelevance in the brightness of daylight. 'Mr. Dickson leaning against the doorpost with a melancholy pimpled face, looking as irrelevant to the daylight as last night's guttered candle.'    Source: George Eliot,...

Like a kitten

Like a kitten

This novel is to a great extent about the relationship between brother and sister Maggie and Tom Tulliver. She loves him fiercely and as a child is desperate for his affection and approval. Here she knocks over something he has been building and incurs his fury. The...

As helpless as …

As helpless as …

The wonderful little girl Maggie, in a fit of pique and sorrow, hacks off her glorious dark curls and then succumbs to horror at the consequences, such as anger and mockery among the family.  She hides herself in the attic to avoid them, which leads to other equally...

It runs in families like …

It runs in families like …

George Eliot uses an asthmatic simile to reveal the religious prejudices of her characters. If they considered that it runs in families 'like asthma', you may assume they didn't approve of chapel-goers. The light and gently humorous touch is typical of her delicate...

Life simile

Life simile

What a surprising simile for life - at least in its easeful moments - likening it to a familiar tool worn to the shape of the fingers holding it, comfortably sitting in the palm of the hand which over time has itself shaped the handle. '... where life seemed like a...

Wrung from the soul

Wrung from the soul

Maggie Tulliver is a deep-feeling woman of painful sincerity, and here words are wrung from her, with a wrenching simile. 'These words were rung forth from Maggie's deepest soul, with an effort like the convulsed clutch of a drowning man.'    Source: George...

An unmapped river

An unmapped river

A marvelous image for human destinies, usually well hidden no matter the efforts we make to discern them. Since this engaging classic revolves around a mill - and a related family - on the River Floss, the watery metaphor has particular resonance, and all the more so...

The garment of silence

The garment of silence

The hum of insects, bees buzzing about the flowers, can be one of the most soothing of sounds and George Eliot has a beautiful way to describe this sweet song.'... and listen to the hum of insects, like tiniest bells on the garment of Silence.' Source: George Eliot,...

My head’s alive

My head’s alive

Like an old cheese ... a surprising and original way to describe a lively mind, writhing with ideas and plans. Hope you have moments like this, when they flow so thick and fast that 'one knocks another over'. 'I think my head's all alive inside like an old cheese, for...

As open as …

As open as …

A limpid simile for being open and transparent. If only more people were like Maggie Tulliver, although it can be said that her openness is not without difficulty for her.'... she was as open and transparent as a rock-pool.' Source: George Eliot, The Mill...

As gentle and powerful as …

As gentle and powerful as …

An unusual pairing of adjectives and a surprising simile to embrace both. 'No thundering from a pulpit, no condemnation from bad churches, no peer pressure, just a book of scripture quietly waiting to say hello, as gentle and powerful as a little girl's...

As secular as…

As secular as…

A refreshing simile, surprising in its flavour, likening secularity to ice cream. 'Father saw himself as part of the New India - rich, modern and as secular as ice cream.'   Source: Yann Martel, Life of Pi (Edinburgh: Canongate Books, 2003), p. 65...

As rooted as…

As rooted as…

A good simile for a certain rugged tenacity, in this case referring to the nascent Christian community as it emerged from being a possibly evanescent sect into a full blown religion. 'Because it thought of itself as 'the true Israel', the Christian...

Twain on technology

Twain on technology

This simile was devised by Mark Twain to account for his inability to use Edison's new-fangled recording phonograph as a means of dictating his writing.  He clearly needed technology that could answer back. Curious to see the devil depicted as unsmiling,...

Girders like insect legs

Girders like insect legs

An unexpected way to convey the chaotic structural metalwork of half-finished buildings.  From Rory Stewart's engaging account of his walk across Afghanistan. 'On the flat roofs of half-finished shopping arcades, bare girders clustered like dead insect...

Where life meets death

Where life meets death

A surprising metaphor for the inexorable link between life and death, with the same sense of something encroaching with age. From the slim, touching and spare novel by Robert Seethaler. 'Death belonged to life like mould to bread.'   Source: Robert...

An artesian well

An artesian well

Peter Brown writes ancient history with verve and colour, bringing to life an era which can sometimes be passed over as dull if not dark, when nothing much happened beyond the implosion of the Roman Empire, followed by the ransacking of its buildings for...

Demons as microbes

Demons as microbes

I liked this analogy to help us grasp how demons were perceived in late antiquity, apparently more matter of factly than one might have thought.  Like microbes, best avoided but not worth losing sleep over.  But note the following comment, that early...

Rising like a damp-stain

Rising like a damp-stain

In addition to the infiltration of Christianity, seeping into Hellenic culture, as this historian memorably puts it, 'like a damp-stain', I also liked description of the Roman Emperor Julian's (r. 361-63) clarity as having been borne of hatred.  Whence...

Hungry Buddha

Hungry Buddha

A wonderful description of Boris Johnson in the recent BBC debate among candidates for the role of Prime Minister. When I read this, I thought, 'That's it, that's how he looked!'  The hungry Buddha looks on course to be the next PM. 'As Stewart squirmed...

Particles of human life

Particles of human life

This week, glad to share fine metaphors both written by journalists. Here The Economist pays a suitably eloquent and moving tribute to Vasily Grossman's writing, capturing perfectly his skill in conveying the granular human effects of people being ground...

More plentiful than …

More plentiful than …

An ambiguous metaphor for plenty, since it is entirely subjective whether you consider hope to be plentiful or not.  In other words, this is only a relative plenty. See other hope related metaphors and similes, such as Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot or...

Six ways to get lost

Six ways to get lost

This is from The Little Clay Cart, a Sanskrit play probably composed around the 2nd century BC, and commonly attributed to a possibly mythical king and playwright called S(h)udraka.  I liked the rambling explanation of the simple word 'lost' through half a...

Sticking like a burr

Sticking like a burr

I've heard people describe someone as sticking like glue, or like Velcro, and burrs were the original inspiration for this modern sticky material. Woodnoth, then, was a bit of a boring hanger-on of the poet George Herbert. 'Woodnoth sticking to Herbert...

The press and vice

The press and vice

An extraordinary and vivid image of sin as something that forces pain to infiltrate every vein.  Given the more pious age in which Herbert wrote, and his own great piety, I found this arresting and thought-provoking. It also neatly concatenates the two...

Good strong tea

Good strong tea

A novel way to signal strong tea, its being so solid that it can support a mouse's weight.  The more common version of the same idea has the tea 'so strong you could stand a spoon up in it'. For another tea-related simile, less innocuous, see Mervyn...

An aching loss

An aching loss

The occasional ache of something long lost - Leigh Fermor's likening it to an old wound; more less healed, but can still give you gip on a bad day. 'The loss of the journal still aches now and then like an old wound in bad weather.' For a quote-mosaic...

The taste of brass

The taste of brass

You can feel it can't you - that cold-surface metallic sensation in your mouth?John Keats fell in love and fell fatally ill within a short period of time, parting definitively from Fanny Brawne when it was concluded that the best chance he had of surviving...

The backward bin

The backward bin

John Keats' letters are full of wry humour and playfulness, interwoven with a rage to live and frustration and despair at the TB which killed him within a few years. Here, writing to his beloved Fanny Brawne, I delighted in his offering to be to her as...

A protagonist in a lost world

A protagonist in a lost world

This suggests an expansive speaker with vast ideas; one who embraces the world, makes perorations rather than utterances, and generally waves his arms about as he speaks.Miller is a master of refreshing metaphors and similes. 'He always talked against a...

A warm Asiatic smile

A warm Asiatic smile

You can feel the warmth of this beaming smile, lighting up someone's face, feeling like a loving arm wrapped about their shoulder. 'That warm Asiatic smile which always spread over his face like nectar and ambrosia.' See George Eliot for another surprising...

Scepticism on legs

Scepticism on legs

A delightful accusation of a doubting Thomas, his whole body an agglomeration of questions and disbelief. 'Truly, you are a walking interrogation and disbelief endowed with arms.'   Source: Jose Saramago, The History of the Siege of Lisbon, trans....

On illusory madness

On illusory madness

A fine description of Mervyn Peake's balance between bounding imagination and taut writing, rounded off with a vintage metaphor.'It remains essentially a work of the closed imagination, in which a world parallel to our own is presented in almost paranoiac...

Slow words emerging

Slow words emerging

A halting mode of speech, the words slow-emerging, like the tearing of pages from a long-closed book. That is how Dante's translator presents us with the first encounter with Virgil, who would be his guide through much of his journey.'His words emerged: as if with...

All-encompassing flow

All-encompassing flow

The cadence of this metaphor has the abundance and freshness of clear, flowing water. It likens Virgil, whom Dante views as the poet who taught him how to write, to multiple sources of inspiration: spring, well, fountain and river.This liquid idea cascades naturally...

As warm as …

As warm as …

A surprising simile, something as ordinary and comforting as warm tea, here poured differently to describe a stream of blood.  Steerpike is the worst person in the granite pile of Gormenghast - may we all be spared his scheming type.'The blood, streaming...

As ripe as …

As ripe as …

Swelter is assailed by life-sapping loathing for Flay, who returns the compliment.  Their battle is astounding for its intensity and outcome. Here a bursting simile for murderous hatred ready to pop.'... while Swelter, whose frustrated blood-lust was ripe...

As the falcon flies

As the falcon flies

Even the rhythm of this simile conveys something of a great bird's single, confident swoop to land precisely on a specific, awaiting glove.'But flying, as the falcon to the gloveSwoops home when signalled.'For another sleek and powerful bird in flight, see Henry...

As dogs in summer

As dogs in summer

Desperate people, condemned to eternal infernal cruelties, are likened to dogs failing to fight off the tiny tormenting assaults of insects.'On either side their hands beat in defenceNow from the flames, now from the burning sand,As dogs in summer fight the...

A milliner’s invention

A milliner’s invention

Again, the charming Swelter, whose every move is offensive to one sense or another. See, for example, the sound of his feet when he walks. Here his gaping yawn makes nudity seem prim.'He does not listen for an answer, but yawns, his face opening lewdly...

Sucking at stones

Sucking at stones

Swelter is one of the less attractive characters in Mervyn Peake's sprawling, crawling, mossy pile of forgotten granite, Gormenghast.  He consumes prodigious quantities of food and wine and is consumed by hatred (fully reciprocated).Peake depicts his...

Of guardian trees

Of guardian trees

A beautiful way to convey the kind, protective presence of someone quietly keeping an eye on the well-being of another.  I hope you have such benevolence in your life, from both people and trees. 'As the days passed he began to know her better, in the...

Quick as …

Quick as …

Not an eye you would want settling its penetrating gaze on you, giving you a cold adder-quick assessment through the lace curtains of its blood-alley veins. This is one of many descriptions of a quite terrifying individual.'So alive is it, this eye, quick...

As huge as …

As huge as …

Mervyn Peake is a fount of original similes and metaphors.  Given the granite-gothic ambiance of Gormenghast, it makes sense that 'huge' should evoke 'doom'. '... at their centre, between the brittle petals, lies a pool of indigo, translucent and as huge...

Like a wound…

Like a wound…

A stunningly original depiction of the pink streaks of dawn resembling a sky-wound. '... as the dawn like a wound in the sky welled into her consciousness...'See also our bestellar review of this book, with its lavishly illustrated quote-mosaic, packed...

Life lived as a rose trellis

Life lived as a rose trellis

One of Rilke's translators used this surprising and touching metaphor to describe him. I like the idea of being - figuratively - a human trellis for beauty to grow upon. 'Roses climb his life as if he were their trellis.' Source: Quoted in Year of Wonder,...

The sky fallen down

The sky fallen down

One of the most English of memories is bluebell tapestried woodland in April - I have a particular recollection of this sky-carpet in a wood in Devon. Combined with sunlight dappling through the early leaf canopy, it creates an intimacy of delicate colour,...

Like sticks of barley sugar

Like sticks of barley sugar

It's years since I saw a stick of barley sugar, and this perhaps dates Donald Hall's otherwise quite timeless writing. But I like the resemblance of a tower to a fat, straight confection.This is from a lovely book - Hall lived in Romania in the early part...

Bullocks under the bonnet

Bullocks under the bonnet

Imagine the car bucking and lurching over pot holes and road bumps, creating the random jolts and yanks of a rodeo ride.This is from a lovely book - Hall lived and travelled in Romania in the early part of the 20th century, and wrote this affectionate,...

Like a burst of hope

Like a burst of hope

A heartening simile in a vivid, gripping narrative of humans ground between the shifting tectonic plates of contradictory but equally totalitarian ideologies. There is neither much sunshine nor hope in the book, but such hope as there is is tenacious and...

Like sunlight on a landscape

Like sunlight on a landscape

You can see an overcast English landscape of rolling hills and fields, and a sudden break in the clouds pierced by a spotlight of sunshine.  This is a lovely novel, with the sunny wit of Jane Austen and the earthiness of George Eliot.‘And as for Molly, her...

Nervous as horses

Nervous as horses

A jumpy, unsettling opening to a powerful page that drives to the source of fury in Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath. You can imagine horses prancing, shying, frisking, snorting and whinnying, eyeing askance an oncoming tempest. You can imagine that what's to...

Eyes like lakes

Eyes like lakes

A surprising simile: lake-like eyes reflecting the sky.  Something touching too about the contrast of apparently wide open eyes, and a face that resembles a rocky, ugly landscape. 'His eyes were almost transparent as though in a country of ugly hills one...

Blank as a wall, wall as a blank

Blank as a wall, wall as a blank

The identical twins Ladies Cora and Clarice aren't just lookalikes, but also one another's echo chambers.  They live in their own quarters of the rambling pile of Gormenghast, driving themselves round the bend with thirst for 'power' and its resulting...

Dark and small

Dark and small

What a powerful simile, conveying something inward-turning and dangerous through its vivid portrayal of cranial size as a small, corroded bullet. His skull was dark and small like a corroded musket bullet. For other bullet related metaphors and quotations,...

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