In praise of senseless, eternal kindness

In praise of senseless, eternal kindness

Another plea by Grossman for uncomplicated, unplanned and even unwitnessed kindnesses, as opposed to those commandeered by ideologies. Whatever your beliefs, may you give and receive such random acts of kindness in equal measure. ‘The private kindness of one...
Of eyes that saw too much

Of eyes that saw too much

This is part of a detailed, detached account of what happened when people entered a gas chamber, as experienced by Sofya, a Russian doctor in Grossman’s 800 page novel of the Second World War in and around Russia. I found it moving that he focuses on her eyes,...
Captain Grekov’s eyes

Captain Grekov’s eyes

This is a memorable description of Captain Grekov, commander of House 6/1 in the rubble of Stalingrad, summing up so much of the man by the look in his eyes. See also in the same book a touching account of the eyes of a woman – with much of what they had seen in...
The kernel of human kindness

The kernel of human kindness

Having been caught between the colliding tectonic plates of two totalitarian systems, it is easy to see how Grossman saw history not in terms of a matched battle between good and evil, but of a juggernaut trying to mow down seedlings of kindness. Despite – or...
Kindness maketh man

Kindness maketh man

What makes us human?  Simple kindness is a key element according to Grossman.  It depends partly on how you define ‘human’ of course, whether to describe a particular species, or in the sense that is redolent with tenderness, vulnerability, feeling,...
An anatomy of anguish

An anatomy of anguish

This graphic and heart-rending typology of despair makes me conscious of having been mercifully spared much of anything that could be likened to despair.  Count your blessings, indeed. ‘Abarchuk sighed.  ‘You know what, someone ought to write a treatise on...
Love among the rubble

Love among the rubble

This refers to a love affair that burgeons in the grimness of Stalingrad, and I like how Grossman expands the spectrum to show that love can happen in the worst places, full of ‘noise, stench and rubble’.  The photo by Angela Compagnone seemed the perfect...
A thousand years of history

A thousand years of history

On the centenary of the October Revolution, I wonder how Russians today would feel about this terse statement by Grossman. ‘Russia has seen many things during the one thousand years of its history. There is only one thing that Russia has not seen in one thousand...

Pin It on Pinterest