Zeus dispenses with practicalities

Zeus dispenses with practicalities

Zeus here neatly rebuffs his daughter Athene’s requests. I like his suitably arch reaction, which puts all supplicants in their petty place, even gorgeous goddesses, allowing the god of gods to just hang out on Olympus undisturbed. ‘Child, I am God, Please do...
Of leaderless leadership

Of leaderless leadership

‘Leadership’ litters newspapers and networks such as LinkedIn, with people claiming to embody it, or vaunting the leadership of others. It’s perhaps one of the most over-hyped terms of our time, and rarely less convincingly than when combined with...
Hopelessly insane: Homer fans

Hopelessly insane: Homer fans

Here Christopher Logue highlights the sheer vital durability of Homer and the magnitude of such sustainability, kept alive through a hard core of ‘Unprofessional Ancient Greek Readers’. I don’t know if I qualify, since the UAGR could refer only to...
Anagnorisis

Anagnorisis

Normally referring to the moment in a play or other work when a character makes a critical discovery, perhaps understanding the real situation for the first time.   I liked Nicolson’s use of it in describing Keats’ discovery of Homer: ‘Keats had read and stared in...
A luminous spot in Chicago

A luminous spot in Chicago

What makes a city great?  What makes a civilization? How about a bright, quiet, dazzling new building in the heart of a town, housing 30,000 volumes of poetry?  A place where you can step off the street into poetry through a single glass door. Before going to Chicago,...
Storm-driven sea

Storm-driven sea

Odysseus grappled with Poseidon’s fury and his storm-driven seas.  Its unrelenting onslaught is one of the most terrifying aspects Homer conveyed graphically. ‘A storm-driven sea appears to acquire a vitality and viciousness, a desire to do damage, which...
Monstrous-beautiful Sirens

Monstrous-beautiful Sirens

The prelude to the monstrous-destructive obstacles Odysseus has to overcome, or bypass, to reach home. ‘After the monstrous-beautiful Sirens, Odysseus comes to the limb-consuming Scylla and her friend the body-gulping Charybdis.  Scylla is a six-headed,...
Limb-consuming Scylla

Limb-consuming Scylla

I appreciated Nicolson’s summing up the twin terrors as two aspects of the female threat. ‘After the monstrous-beautiful Sirens, Odysseus comes to the limb-consuming Scylla and her friend the body-gulping Charybdis.  Scylla is a six-headed, rock-bound,...
Flat-footed view

Flat-footed view

Nicolson’s writing helped cure me of any ‘flat-footed view’ I may have had of the Bronze Age, spinning its warriors from text-book two-dimensionality to full-blooded 3-D. ‘It is what comes next that re-orientates any flat-footed view of Bronze...

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