As distinct as…

As distinct as…

I like this geometric juxtaposition, though I might have made the distinction sharper: as distinct as circle and square?  As distinct as line and circle? ‘Distinct as polygon and square.’ Source: Christopher Logue, War Music: An account of Books 1-4 and...
The icy scabs of the earth

The icy scabs of the earth

A depiction of the north and south ice caps, as ‘icy scabs at either end of the earth’.  And then having them wince in their sleep as Achilles’ distant scream reaches them from its middling latitude.   ‘He lifts his face to 90; draws his...
Round as…

Round as…

Round as a moon isn’t surprising, but the addition of the spring, makes it richer and fuller and a more resonant metaphor. ‘His shield as round and rich as moons in spring.’   Source: Christopher Logue, War Music: An account of Books 1-4 and...
Quiet in quiet rooms

Quiet in quiet rooms

A simple movement, settling back against a rope, evoking entire lives spent leaning into comfort and quiet, disengaging from din and adventure. ‘Elsewhere late afternoon goes lazily enough. And yawning as he leaves his tent To sigh and settle back against a rope...
Stunt-hoop tambourines

Stunt-hoop tambourines

The timbre and beat of martial music as the Greek states gather behind Agamemnon for an almighty war.   ‘Immediately Wide-ruling Agamemnon’s voices called Greece to its feet, and set it on the move. And as they moved, To stunt-hoop tambourines and trumpet drums…’...
Clear-voiced heralds

Clear-voiced heralds

Logue’s vivid rendition of several episodes in the Iliad pulsates with fresh phrasing and is a trove of triologisms. Here, the Greeks are summoned to war. ‘No more talk. The King will arm. You lords will join the host, Answering our clear-voiced heralds as they call –...
Tassel-ankled feet

Tassel-ankled feet

As the Greeks gather for war, the goddess Athena rallies them.   ‘The Daughter Prince, ash-eyed Athena, flew Her father’s awning, called the Aegis, blue, Broad as an upright sky, a second sky Over their shoulders rippling estuary, And turned the pad Of...
Close as …

Close as …

If you can withstand the shock of the thock of the arrow passing through eyes, the simile ‘as close as a layer of paint’ could be used in less violent contexts.  Logue is a master metaphorist. ‘Arrows that thock, that enter eyes, that pass Close as a layer of paint …’...
Seen through water

Seen through water

The impact of Gray’s sword causing it to bend in the air as it would appear to bend if submerged and refracted in water.  What an image! ‘Gray’s sword Bent as if seen through water…’ Source: Christopher Logue, War Music: An account of Books 1-4 and 16-19 of Homer’s...

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