Mastiff-like tenacity

Mastiff-like tenacity

Such jaw-gripping tenacity is used to describe the force that the ending ‘-cious’ adds to words, as in the word ‘tenacious’.  Thoreau observes and analyses language as incisively as he observes and analyses nature. ‘… the...
Graidely or gradely

Graidely or gradely

Graidely seems an alternative spelling to ‘gradely’ which means fine and good; promising and likely; being in good health or physically attractive; fitting and proper. “He’s took a graidely fancy to thee.  He wants to see thee and he wants to...
Fair moithered

Fair moithered

Bothered or bewildered.  ‘Moither’ can also mean to ramble or speak in a confused way. ‘Mother’s a good-tempered woman, but she gets fair moithered.’   Source: Frances Hodgson Burnett, The Secret Garden, illus. Inga Moore (London:...
What’s in a word?

What’s in a word?

This poem was written by a great uncle who shared my grandfather’s love of books and became a writer, also earning a degree in English literature in his retirement since there weren’t the funds for him to go to university when he was young. I discovered...
Savssats

Savssats

Savssats ‘occur most often in fjords, where a band of sea ice too wide for marine mammals to swim under on a single breath cuts them off from the open sea.  As the fjord continues to freeze over, the animals are restricted to a smaller and smaller opening in the ice...
Windrows

Windrows

‘A long line of raked hay, corn sheaves, or peats laid out to dry in the wind.  In North American English: a long line of material heaped up by the wind.’ ‘Windrows of feather from molting geese.’   Source: OED and Barry Lopez, Arctic Dreams, p....

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