Pithy, evocative imagery in three-legged microcosms of meaning.  Having coined the term ‘triologism’ I believe this to be the only collection of these tum-tee-tum phrases in the universe.  Updated Tuesdays … triologism day!  

Tide-rippled sea

Nicolson's book is as much about the sea as the land, and the tidal pull it exerted for centuries on...

Honeyed hope

Sounds lovely, although Erasmus uses it to refer to the hare-brained gold, elixir or immortality quests of alchemists.  One more...

Bright and brighter

The Trojan Hector goes on the attack with his beautiful horses, bright-maned, a complement to the bright-patterned shield of Odysseus.

...

Champagne-bottle shoulders

What a charming if old-fashioned sounding description of sloping beauty, in this case referring to voluptuous Europa.  And 'callipygous' describes...

Rain-thrashed pools

Gormenghast is made for storms and this one allows Steerpike to further insinuate himself into the life of the castle....

Moss-gloved trees

Years of dripping rain from these moss-soft trees, in an endlessly dank, chill climate, has tanned the leather of a...

Deep-wooded creeks

An evocative image of deep-wooded creeks, especially when you imagine people bound for America, often forced to leave, looking upon...

Fish-haunted seas

Loved this sense of ichthyo-abundance in seas now widely depleted of fish stocks. And the idea of a gift for...

Silver-plated water

I have seen beaten-bronze and copper-coloured water, but never silver-plated.

'The cool, placid, silver-plated water at even coolly awaits the...

Sweet-blooded natures

A description of the Reverend Irwine, whose sisters are elsewhere described as being entirely superfluous.  He is the only person...

Beam-borne planks

A poetic description of an ancient and abandoned bell tower; somehow 'beam-borne' implies flying rather than static, and I liked...

Iron-braced door

A door to keep enemies at bay?  Except perhaps Grendel who would have torn it off by the hinges.

Source: Seamus...

Kind-hearted termagant

Great word ‘termagant’, sadly underused and, referring as it does to bad-tempered women, no doubt politically unacceptable. Here it describes...

1 Comment

  1. B.G. Simons

    Interesting! Your triologisms remind me of the two-word kennings in Beowulf.

    Reply

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