Pithy, evocative imagery in three-legged microcosms of meaning.  Having coined the term ‘triologism’ I believe this to be the only collection of these tum-tee-tum phrases in the universe.  Updated Tuesdays … triologism day!  

Half-comprehended notions

I remember childhood dreams and hauntings of 'half-comprehended notions': cold war threats of nuclear annhilation, and being told the Soviet...

Sand-traced effigy

Thoughts are intangible and yet can prove more indelible than things physically wrought. The idea of a sandy effigy effaced...

Marrow-freezing

Jane Eyre, first as a child and later as a woman, is subjected to a number of 'marrow-freezing incidents' some...

Weather-fretted Abbots

Assuming these are carved in stone, though my first reading had me picturing a human 'weather-fretted' abbot.

Wishing you more...

Brave and courageous

Xiong means ‘male’, ‘grand’, or 'having great power or influence', and is used in the word for ‘hero’.   Here, combined...

Storm-nibbled heads

A thousand years of storm wear wipes the faces from the stone heads decorating Gormenghast stormenghast, eyes and features flattened...

Life-long joy

One of the curious things about Hetty is that George Eliot shows her no mercy, and inspires none in us. ...

Sun-refracting facet

Mani is a stark and unforgiving landscape, conveyed with sharp-edged precision by Leigh Fermor.

'But there were no bridges or...

Of wine-blue water

The first time I read of the wine-blue Greek sea, I was baffled.  However, I took a second translation to...

Limb-consuming Scylla

I appreciated Nicolson's summing up the twin terrors as two aspects of the female threat.

'After the monstrous-beautiful Sirens, Odysseus...

All-seeing eyes

A fictitious dedication in the novel, imbuing its artist-narrator with an almost godly omnivision, although he doesn't portray himself as...

Reed-fringed banks

An image of lazy summer afternoons messing about on rivers.

Source: Arthur Ransome, Coot Club (London: Jonathan Cape, 2009 (1934)),...

Moonacre Manor

This white horse flits in and out of the eponymous story: like the moon, illuminating when visible, but otherwise elusive. ...

1 Comment

  1. B.G. Simons

    Interesting! Your triologisms remind me of the two-word kennings in Beowulf.

    Reply

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