Pithy, evocative imagery in three-legged microcosms of meaning.  Having coined the term ‘triologism’ I believe this to be the only collection of these tum-tee-tum phrases in the universe.  Updated Tuesdays … triologism day!  

Tide-swayed fronds

An otter's eye view of the world, with its human connections and its human-free watery paradise.

Maxwell's classic account of...

God-trodden chaos

This vivid re-telling of Christ's story evokes a human hunger for unity and enlightenment, and freedom from 'God-trodden chaos'.  This...

Prawn-coloured motes

Having spent his long and entire adult life ensconced in the castle walls of Gormenghast, Flay, now dismissed, finds a...

Light-hearted colours

What a delightful way to describe a palette of colours: light-hearted.  What hues would it include?  Sky blue, dancing fuchsia,...

Sand-traced effigy

Thoughts are intangible and yet can prove more indelible than things physically wrought. The idea of a sandy effigy effaced...

Bubble-whitened water

Bubbles blow and roll through Williamson's prose, through the ebullition of both water and otters. Otters blow bubbles when they...

Wind-slabbed snow

Crunching home through snow after a winter walk, we found ourselves on such wind-slabs, albeit more modest in scale, Swiss...

High-perched asylum

In his acknowledgements, Leigh Fermor thanks a number of people for 'kindness and haven during restless literary displacements', and it...

Winter-defying hawk

What majesty in this triologism - a hawk thriving despite a New England winter.

'The warmest springs hardly allow me...

Briars and birds

Trying to think what species of birds would yield a rainbow of wings, in England.  Robins, blue-tits and finches, perhaps.

...

Wave-worn boulders

An alliterative view of things water-worn over time.  I have a burgeoning collection of sea-smoothed pebbles and fragments of glass...

Remember to eat

An amazingly intricate way to remind you to eat, no matter what the gods are hurling at you. Artemis is the...

1 Comment

  1. B.G. Simons

    Interesting! Your triologisms remind me of the two-word kennings in Beowulf.

    Reply

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